How we prepare your pet for anaesthetic.

Once you relinquish your pet to the green fairies, you may be wondering what actually happens “out the back”.

Well, wonder no more. Firstly we make sure that we have an accurate weight for your pet as this is what we use to calculate the dose of the drugs that we give your pet. Once we have this we settle them in a kennel with nice squishy blankets while we go and get everything prepared.

If you have opted for, or we have recommended, a blood sample before anaesthesia then your pet is taken to a quiet part of the practice where we can safely take the sample. To take the sample, a patch of hair is shaved over the jugular vein which runs down the side of the neck, to one side of the windpipe and a needle is inserted to collect the blood. Most animals tolerate this quite well with the gentle yet firm restraint that we green fairies have down to a fine art. Some animals on the other hand object quite vociferously and may have to have the blood sample taken once they are anaesthetised. Not ideal but better if they are getting too stressed.

Once the results have come back and been received by the veterinary surgeon, they can decide what to pre-med with and whether the use of intravenous fluids is necessary. Intravenous fluids are usually considered if there is any elevation of the liver and kidney enzymes which show that these organs need a little help during anaesthesia as that is where most of the drugs used are metabolised. Some veterinary surgeons also advocate the use of fluid therapy during routine bitch spays as a spay is a fairly major and invasive procedure and fluids help maintain blood pressure and support the body during this procedure.

There are a few ways that we can induce anaesthesia in your pet. One way is to use the anaesthetic gas and get them to breathe the gas in via a mask or an anaesthetic chamber. This way is usually used with smaller creatures such as rabbits, guinea pigs and rats and they fit into the anaesthetic chamber and can have oxygen administered in this way before the gas is turned on.

Another way is to inject an anaesthetic agent called Propofol into the vein and then maintain anaesthesia directly into the airway using an endotracheal tube which is fitted into the windpipe. This is the most commonly used induction for surgeries as induction is quick, Propofol wears off quickly and then the anaesthetic can be controlled with the gas.

The final way is to inject a combination of sedative and tranquilliser drugs into the muscle, usually the lumbar muscle or the quadriceps. This way is usually used for short, less painful and less invasive procedures such as cat castrates where the animal only needs to be asleep for a short period and is reversible with another injection.

If your pet is having surgery, the affected area will have to be shaved and cleaned to maintain the sterility of the site. This is why we advise that dogs are fairly clean when they come in so that we don’t have to spend so much time cleaning them which means they spend less time under anaesthetic.

So, that answers the question of how we prepare your pet for anaesthetic or why he has so many bald patches!

If you are worried about your pet’s surgery please talk to your vet, or check any post op symptoms with our Interactive Symptom Guide to see how urgent the problem may be.

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