Are your cat’s kidneys crock? – The signs of kidney failure

Kidney failure is very common in cats, between 20% and 50% over the age of 15 will suffer to some degree. Unfortunately, it is often missed until it becomes advanced because the early symptoms are subtle and our feline friends are very good at hiding illness. However, the sooner it is caught the better

In most cases the cause for the kidney’s failing is unknown, it is just a gradual dying off of the tissue, particularly in elderly cats. If younger animals are diagnosed with the problem then can be a more obvious cause but it doesn’t often change the treatment plan.

The kidneys are the filtering organs for the blood. They remove all the waste products and toxins, sending them out in the urine. When they start to malfunction they become less efficient, these by-products stay in the body and, as they are effectively poisons, make the animal feel unwell and mildly nauseous. They are often mildly dehydrated, so it is not unlike a permanent hangover.

Feeling sick understandably means affected cats have poor appetites and to survive the body has to break down its own tissue. Unfortunately, this creates very high levels of toxic metabolites, which stay in the blood stream, make the cat feel worse, so they eat even less and so the vicious cycle continues. The toxins themselves also directly damage the kidneys, further exacerbating the problem….

How to get your kids involved in your cat’s care

Everybody loves a kitten. They’re cute, they’re cuddly and they do lots of funny things which make great YouTube videos. Your kids may have been pestering you for years to get a kitten and at first, all eyes are on the new little ball of fluff. Over time, however, the children’s interest in the little critter often fades along with their promises to help with their daily care. Sure, you could easily care for the cat on your own, but don’t give in that easily – learning to care for another living creature is a lesson that not only your kids will benefit from, but your cat as well. Here are a few ways to get your children more involved in the care of your cat.

1. Have your child take responsibility for feeding the cat every day

Most children can learn to feed a cat, and many get great joy out of watching them eat their meals. Wet food can be fed in a different place every day – your cat will start to follow your child around the house as they choose the next spot, providing exercise and entertainment for everybody involved. Dry food can be scattered on the kitchen floor, to be chased and caught by the cat, or placed in a treat ball so they have to work at getting it out. This may sound a bit mean at first, but is actually closer to their natural feeding behaviours. Of course, you could just ask your child to put the food in the bowl every day, but that can get a bit dull after a while….

Ask a vet online-‘my cat has suddenly lost weight, she was fine a few weeks ago’

Question from Gemma Loopylou Moorey:

I has my cat suddenly lost weight I can even fill her ribs now she was fine a few weeks ago. Even her mood is changed she meows loudly when I talk to her in a bad mood way

Answer from Shanika Winters online vet:

Hi Gemma and thank you for your question regarding your cats sudden weight loss and change of temperament. I will discuss in my answer some possible cause for the changes you have noticed in your pet. I would advise that you take your cat to see your vet as soon as possible.

A sudden loss of a significant amount of weight can be very dangerous for your cat, regardless of the cause of the weight loss in the first place such changes can lead to organs failing and your cat being in need of emergency veterinary care.

An average cat weighs between 4 and 6 kg so even a change of a few 100g of weight is significant on such a small animal. Ideally your vet will weigh your cat each time they are seen; it is easy to keep track of your cat’s weight at home too, weigh your cat carrier empty and then with your cat inside and the difference is your cat’s weight…

Zoonotic diseases – what could you catch from your pet?

Zoonosis is any disease that can pass from animal to human. Although most are easily treated, some of them can be serious and even fatal. Below are several zoonotic diseases that can be passed from dogs and cats, sometimes via other organisms that use the dog and cat as their host.

Toxocariasis

These are the roundworms of the dog and cat (and other species). They can be transferred to humans via their eggs which are left in soil after infected animals have defecated. Children are more predisposed to ingesting the eggs as they might play in the soil and not wash their hands. Adults can also ingest the eggs from eating raw vegetables that have not been washed properly.

If the infection is heavy or repeated, it can cause the disease ‘visceral larva migrans’. This is when the worm larvae move through the body and causing swelling to the major organs and affecting the central nervous system. High-temperature, coughing even pneumonia are various symptoms. The disease is also known to cause ‘ocular larva migrans’ when the worm larvae enter the eye….

June bugs – stopping parasites from bugging your pets!

Hurrah, it’s June! Which means the weather is (hopefully) warming up and summer is just around the corner! However, just as we enjoy the sunny conditions, so do the bugs and beasties that live on our pets. A little forethought and treatment now, can save a whole lot of trouble (and maybe some vets bills!) in the future.

Fleas

These irritating little creatures are the ones everyone thinks about as the weather warms but here’s an interesting fact; actually the worst time of year for fleas is the Autumn. Then the few fleas our pets have picked up over the summer move into our centrally heated houses and have a party. However, what that means is by protecting our pets over the summer, we not only keep them from getting itchy bites now, we can stop a house infestation later!

It can be surprisingly difficult to know if an animal has fleas….

Ask a vet online- ‘I have been using frontline every four weeks but still find the odd flea’

Question from :Marilyn Ann Faulkner

‘ I have a small but bulky pug cross jack Russell, who has had a problem with fleas, I have been using frontline every four weeks but still find the odd flea on him, have also treated the whole house with Acclaim household flea spray. Thinking of perhaps changing to advocate spot on. My dog weighs in at 10.5 kilos, so should I use up to 10kg size or maybe change to 10-25kg. This probably sounds like a silly question, but would hate to think that if I used the higher dose it would have a detrimental effect on my dog. Can you advise please.’

Answer from: Shanika Winters

Thanks Marilyn for your question regarding flea control on your dog. It sounds as though you are doing all the correct things by treating your pet with a flea preparation regularly as well as having treated your home. It is really frustrating for both dog and owner when the fleas just do not seem to be going away.

What are fleas and where have they come from?

Fleas are a parasite that lives on our pet and in our homes, the adult fleas need to feed on blood from your pet in order to survive. It is important to be aware that adult fleas are not the only thing we need to get rid of, the flea life cycle involves eggs, which hatch into larvae, these then turn into pupae from which emerge the adult fleas….

Ask a vet online – ‘ have taken our cat to the vet at least 4 times regarding the fact that she has lost the hair on inside of back legs’

Question from Margaret Duke:

Have taken our cat to the vet at least 4 times regarding the fact that she has lost the hair on inside of back legs. Vet thought it maybe an allergy and we stopped allowing her milk. Vet gave her tablets which made her eat [she is a very fuzzy eater] This has gone on for months and she is just the same.

Answer from Shanika Winters:

Hi Margaret, sorry to hear that your cat has been suffering with ongoing hair loss on the inside of her back legs. I will discuss possible causes for the hair loss and some treatment options.

Why has my cat lost hair on the inside of her back legs?

It is really important to have a full clinical examination of any pet suffering from hair loss by your vet to make sure that your pet is in good health, hair loss can be associated with conditions such as hormone imbalances, parasites and allergies . It is also worth being aware that hair loss can be self- inflicted as a result of stress this is often referred to as ‘over grooming’.

Could my cat have an allergy?

Yes it is possible that the hair loss could be due to an allergy causing your cat’s skin to feel uncomfortable and then it licking and chewing away the hair on the inside of its legs. Allergies can be to substances that your cat eats/drinks, breathes in or is in contact with. Most cats are fed a commercially prepared diet with few treats, but if trying to rule out a food allergy a low allergy or specific protein diet (a protein your cat has not eaten before) can be tried….

Does your cat have dementia? – A guide for owners of older felines

It may sound like a silly question but I would bet most owners with older cats could recount multiple examples of ‘feline senility’. Some are funny, some are sad and some are just plain unpleasant. But as tempting as it is to be angry with your cat for, say, mistaking your bed for a litter tray, the truth is that more than 50% of cats over 15 years of age suffer from some degree of dementia, also known as Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CDS). Is your cat one of them?
Let’s start with a couple of questions to get you thinking:

1) Has your older cat started to urinate or defecate in inappropriate places?

2) Does your cat demand more attention that she used to?

3) Have you noticed your cat crying out more frequently, particularly at night?

4) Is your cat less adventurous than he used to be, preferring to stay close to home?

5) Is she behaving strangely – staring at walls, forgetting there is food in her dish or perhaps interacting differently with a housemate?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then your cat is in fact showing at least one of the signs of feline dementia or CDS….

Ask a vet online-’ 9 month old labradoodle tends to bark a lot’ – what can I do?

Question from Sarah Brookes:

I have a 9 month old labradoodle. He tends to bark a lot attention barking I have ignored him but he still barks what else can u do. Also when we leave him he shakes and barks but settles eventually I have an DAP plugged in but seems to make no difference HELP

Answer by Shanika Winters:

Hi Sarah and thank you for your question regarding your dog’s behaviour when he is left. What you are describing sounds like a combination of separation anxiety and attention seeking. Separation anxiety is when animals feel worried when left alone and this can lead to destructive behaviour, toileting in the wrong place and also vocalisation such as the barking you described. Attention seeking is when your pet behaves in a way that you cannot ignore often in similar ways to those already listed.

Why does my dog have separation anxiety/attention seeking behaviour?

It is really important that any medical conditions are first ruled out before starting to treat a behavioural condition. Dogs can show changes to their behaviour when in pain (e.g. arthritis), suffering from epilepsy (having seizures) and when suffering from liver or kidney disease (due to build up of toxic chemicals in their blood).

A detailed history of what is going on with your pet, followed by a thorough clinical examination and diagnostic tests as required….

Caring for older cats – Part 2 – helping your feline through old age

Did you know that cats age the equivalent of 24 human years in their first 2 years of life? After that, each cat year is about equal to 4 human years. So my 18 year old Maddy cat is the same age as my 88 year old grandmother. Doing that calculation helps put her age in perspective, and makes you wonder, am I taking care of her as I would care for my grandmother? In my last blog I talked about some of the signs that your cat may start to show as they get older. Observations such as changes in behaviour, toileting issues or changes in sleep patterns are all relatively common in older cats, but could actually indicate an underlying medical condition. Any changes in your ageing cat should be discussed with your vet so that if there is any concern, the appropriate diagnostic tests can be run and treatment can be started if necessary. But if you and your vet decide that your older cat is physically well, there are still lots of things that you can do to help them age a bit more gracefully.

Give them a nail trim

Most cats, especially those that go outside regularly, don’t need (and don’t want) their nails trimmed. Older cats, however, don’t tend to need them much for hunting, tree climbing or fighting with their neighbours. Although feline claws naturally shed with daily activity, the nails of older, less active cats tend to get overgrown and can even grow all the way around and into the pad of the foot, a very painful condition. Even if they’re not overgrown, they still frequently get stuck on the sofa or their bedding, particularly if the cat suffers from arthritis and has limited movement. Trimming the claws is relatively straightforward and most of the time you can do it at home. Ask your vet or vet nurse for a demonstration if you are unsure.

Give them a toilet

Would you want your 88 year old grandmother to have to go downstairs, out the back door and down the garden to use an outside loo in the middle of the night?….

More Useful Information

Examining your pet

Simple ways to check the health of your pet. Vets use these techniques as part of their clinical examiniation.

Medicating your pet

Arming you with the same simple techniques for stress free pill giving.

Worming & Flea Treatment

Information and advice in treating your pet for worms and fleas.