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Why would an experienced vet go back to college? Here’s why…

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The university course leading to a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery is by necessity a hard-working, information-packed five years. The focus has traditionally been on accumulating facts, with the presumption that other aspects of being a vet can be learned later, when life in practice has commenced. As a result, there has sometimes been a perception (which may or may not be true) that new graduates can be over-academic, with a tendency to be impractical.

An innovative response to this criticism has been established at many vet schools, with a concept known as the “Practitioner-in-Residence”
. An experienced veterinary surgeon leaves their own practice for a period of ten weeks, to spend time at the Veterinary College, teaching students about “real life”. A few years ago, I was lucky enough to fill this role at my own local vet college….

Fear of fireworks can affect cats as well as dogs: how do we know, and what can we do to help them?

In the veterinary blogging world, there are key seasonal topics that come up every year: hazards around the home at Christmas, chocolate poisoning at Easter, heat stroke in summer and, of course, the fear of fireworks at Halloween/ Guy Fawkes Day. It can be a challenge to come up with a new angle every year: it could be tempting to find an old article, re-jig it and re-phrase it, and the job is done. After all if you plagiarise yourself, is there anything wrong with that?

A better answer, however, is to seek out a completely new angle. So with the help of the Wikivet archives, instead of writing a repeat blog of what to do with dogs that are terrified of fireworks, here’s an alternative: how to help cats cope with fear of fireworks….

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Preparing for Fireworks – with Sound?

Firework fears are one of the commonest behavioural issues we see in practice – unsurprisingly, a lot of dogs spend the week on either side of Bonfire Night terrified.

In almost every case, this is because of the noise – a sudden, sharp and loud sound, with no obvious warning (from the dog’s point of view). Although a few dogs are afraid of the light show, it’s pretty rare – it’s usually about the sound. The dog’s natural dislike of loud noises is worsened because we get really excited about fireworks, and tend to jump around, shout and exclaim loudly. We know that’s because we’re enjoying the display – but dogs often get the wrong end of the stick and think we’re alarmed, or scared ourselves. Therefore, in their mind, it must be something truly terrifying if humans are afraid of it too…

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Oscar, the grumpy cat who needed twice daily injections to treat his diabetes

Oscar, a ten year old cat, had started to lose weight, despite the fact that he was eating well. His coat had begun to look bedraggled, as if he was not grooming himself as much as usual. His owner had noticed him visiting his water bowl more frequently, and she had needed to fill up the bowl every day, rather than every three days.

When I examined him it was clear that Oscar had lost a significant amount of weight. His ribs were prominent, and I could feel the sharp tips of the bones of his back. When I weighed him, I discovered that he had lost a kilogram since his previous visit.

Physically, I could find no obvious cause of a problem, so I decided that a blood profile was needed…

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What should be done about vets collaborating with puppy farmers?

The BBC Watchdog exposé about a puppy farm in Bradford was shown last night: it provided a shocking reminder of this horrific industry.

Puppy farming is one of those hidden issues in our society. We all know that it goes on, but it happens behind closed doors, and it’s generally only with hind sight that people realise that they have bought a puppy-farmed dog. Typically, somebody sets their mind on a certain breed. They try the “quality breeder” route, but discover that they’ll have to wait four months, and there’s a hefty price tag. So when they find a pup on the internet that’s immediately available, costing 30% less, it can be tempting. They meet the seller in a car park, because “it’s much easier than giving directions to our place in the countryside”. It’s only later, when the initial excitement of welcoming the pup has worn off that they notice the fleas, the worms, the poor body condition and the nervousness, all indications of a classic puppy farm upbringing.

It’s one thing for an unscrupulous breeder to be producing puppies in sub-standard conditions, but what about the vets who may be involved in helping them? I came across one purchaser of a puppy-farmed dog recently who was incensed that her puppy came with a vaccine certificate signed by the local vet. She was furious, and she wrote to the vet, demanding answers to her questions. “Do you do any checks in people bringing litters to your practice? Do you ask to see the parent dogs? Do you do background checks on breeders? Do you not wonder why there are so many puppies? How many litters of pups have you vaccinated for this man?” These are all good questions: how much responsibility should vets take in such situations?

Wikivet blog: oral hygiene – the key to a healthy mouth in pets

It’s well known that regular home care of pets’ teeth is the only way to ensure optimal dental health, but it’s also well known that most owners find this challenging. Dental experts have identified that there are two methods of home care, depending on an owner’s ability to get involved: active and passive.

Brushing your pet’s teeth

a) Active home care is “hands-on” where the pet owner is physically involved with removing plaque and maintaining oral hygiene. Tooth brushing and applying anti-plaque agents directly into the mouth fit into this category. Active home care is the ideal answer, but it isn’t always easy. It’s known as the “gold standard” of preventive dental care….

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Do I really need to worm my horse?

Endoparasites; the gut-wrenching villains that terrorise our horses from their tums to their bums, but how big an issue are they for the average horse? Which worms do we need to be aware of? Is wormer resistance really that big an issue? So many questions, so many drug names.

What is a worm?

A worm, or an endoparasite, is an organism that lives inside of your horse, to your horse’s detriment. We have all seen the adverts for ‘good bacteria’; this is known as a synergistic relationship, where both host and occupier benefit. With parasites, only the parasite gains.

Cyathostomes. Why did the cyathostome always get what he wanted? Because he was so encystant… Excuse my awful jokes; it’s been a long day. Cyathostomes are a type of nematode, or round worm, known as small encysted redworm. The adults, when in the large intestine, produce eggs that the horse will excrete onto their pastures; the eggs then hatch, and the larvae are eaten by the horse. It is also the larvae that are capable of encysting (hiding) in the walls of the large intestine….

How to help stressed-out cats whose owners think they are “behaving badly”

One of the challenges for veterinary surgeons working in the media is that is that they are often asked about one specific patient, with a particular problem. While it’s helpful for the individual owner to discuss their own pet, it can be less enthralling for other readers.

Here are a couple of examples:

Ginger, a 5 year old neutered tom cat, had started urinating in his owner’s bathtub, and occasionally in the sink downstairs. He had always been a “good” cat, going out through the cat flap to do his business. Why would he change like this?
Harry, a two year old neutered male tabby cat, had recently started to suffer from injuries caused by cat fights. His owner…

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Growling terriers: a challenge for the vets who have to try to help them

When I first met Jacko, he growled at me. I had gone out to the waiting room to see who was next. Mr Malone, Jacko’s owner, smiled and said ‘Hello.’ I bent down to greet the little terrier dog, and that is when the growl started. It was a deep, throaty growl, and as I looked into his eyes, I could see no sign of friendliness. I realised at once that this was not a frightened growl. It was an angry, belligerent, trouble-seeking growl. His dilated pupils and flattened ears told me that he wanted to attack. He was keen to have a fight with me. I took two steps back, but the growl did not stop. Instead it grew louder.

On that occasion, Jacko was simply having his annual health check and vaccination. I had the advantage of being in control. and he did not know what to expect. He was walked swiftly into the consulting room and the door was shut behind him. A rapidly applied muzzle took him by surprise, and before he realised that he had been hoodwinked, he had been checked all over, injected and released. As his owner led him out of the consulting room, Jacko kept glancing back at me, as if he was imprinting my image in his memory for future reference.

One month later, Mr Malone was on the phone, in a panic. He had been out for a walk with Jacko, and two big collie dogs had approached them. The dogs had been friendly enough, but Jacko, with his usual impetuosity, had flung himself at the dogs, snarling and growling. The dogs reacted with defensive aggression, and one of them had picked Jacko up by the back of his neck and shaken him. The dog fight had lasted no more than half a minute, and there were no other injuries, but Jacko was now looking very sorry for himself.

When he arrived at the clinic shortly later, Jacko was dripping blood from injuries around his shoulders, and he was breathing very rapidly. It looked as if he might have serious injuries to his chest, with the risk of his lungs been punctured. Yet he still managed to growl as soon as he saw me.

He needed urgent medical treatment, and a full examination was essential. so a swift injection of sedative was the first stage. Jacko was soon deeply asleep. His breathing was comfortable, but he was not moving otherwise. Working quickly, a nurse helped me to clip away the fur from his injuries. There were several deep puncture wounds on both sides of his chest, and there was a large firm swelling beneath one wound. We took some X-rays of his chest, expecting broken ribs and possibly damaged internal organs.

Surprisingly, the X-rays showed that Jacko had escaped serious injury. He was simply very badly bruised, with torn skin and lacerated muscles. Treatment was simple. We flushed the bite wounds to minimise any infection, and he was given a course of antibiotics and strong painkillers. He was then placed back into the kennel for recovery.

We did not need to look at him to monitor his breathing for long, because as soon as the growl started again, we could hear from a distance that he was alive and ready for action.

Jacko has been healthy since that incident. He still comes back once a year for his annual health check. He is the same as ever, although the dog fight episode did change him in one way. Instead of just growling, Jacko has started to howl as soon as he enters our waiting room.…

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Training dogs: can old dogs learn tricks? And what about residential “boot camps” for dogs?

The early autumn is a bit like a mini-New Year. The summer has ended, schools have gone back, and the term-time routines start again. It can be a great time to start new projects, and for many dog owners, that can include tackling the complicated issue of training their pet. Many dog owners have pets with bad habits that they want to change.

Dogs behave in response to the way that their owners treat them. A dog will only beg from the table at mealtime if her owner has taught her to do this by feeding titbits in the past. A dog will only jump up onto the settee if she has been allowed to do this by her owner. It then follows that it is possible to re-train dogs by changing the way we behave towards them. A dog can be re-trained at any age, by using modern dog training methods.

Anybody can set themselves up to be a dog trainer, and so there’s a wide variety of styles and standards in the dog training world. Some have had formal instruction in dog training. Some have even passed exams. Others are self-taught. It’s best to choose trainers who have been taught the latest techniques, and who continue to make an effort to keep themselves up to date….

More Useful Information

Examining your pet

Simple ways to check the health of your pet. Vets use these techniques as part of their clinical examiniation.

Medicating your pet

Arming you with the same simple techniques for stress free pill giving.

Worming & Flea Treatment

Information and advice in treating your pet for worms and fleas.