Browsing tag: dog diet

Ask a vet online – Why is my staffy rubbing his bum on carpet after his glands were done? – Anal gland problems in dogs.

Question from Jo Padfield

Why is my staffy rubbing his bum on carpet after his glands were done. Pls

Answer from Shanika Winters (online vet)

Hi Jo and thank you for your question about your dog’s anal glands. I will explain a little about what anal glands are, where they are and why dogs have them followed by a discussion of what can go wrong with them and how these conditions are treated.

What are anal glands?

The anal sacs (commonly called the anal glands) are a pair of sacs found either side of the anus (bottom); they are around 1cm across and open via a duct (tube) in the anus. As with your dog the anal sacs often become blocked and or infected and this is called anal sacculitis. The substance inside the anal sacs is produced by glands that line the inside of the sacs, this smelly substance should be passed each time your dog does a poo, and leaves a scent marker to other dogs.

What goes wrong with the anal sacs?

Diseases of the anal sacs include anal sacculitis as mentioned and less often tumours. Other conditions around the bottom include anal adenoma (small non-cancerous lumps around the anus), anal furunculosis (cracked infected skin around the anus usually found in German Shepherd Dogs) and perianal hernia (where muscles weaken and separate either side of the anus allowing pelvic and abdominal contents to push through, seen in older uncastrated male dogs).
It is really important to have your dog thoroughly examined by your vet to make sure that the condition has been diagnosed correctly so that the correct treatment can be given.

How are blocked anal sacs treated?

We usually treat blocked anal sacs by manually emptying them out, this can be done by inserting a gloved finger into the anus and gently squeezing on the sac to empty the contents into a piece of tissue paper. The anal sacs can be emptied from the outside but this does not allow the anatomy of the sacs to be examined as thoroughly. Some owners feel confident that they can learn to empty their dog’s anal sacs, this is something to discuss with your vet who can show you how to do this.
If there is infection in the anal sacs then your vet might give your dog antibiotics, this can be given orally or put directly into the anal sacs after they have been flushed out. If the anal sacs are going to be flushed out, most dogs will need sedation or general anaesthesia to allow this to be performed, a small cannula (plastic tube) is passed into the anal sac via the opening of the duct on the anus and saline is then flushed in and the glands then emptied, the process is repeated until the glands appear clean. Antibiotic and anti-inflammatory preparations can then be put into the anal sac. Sometimes steroids may also be given to ease the irritation caused by anal sacculitis.

Anal sacs sometimes are not properly emptied if your dog has soft poo or diarrhoea; this usually improves once your dog’s poo is firm again and can be helped by a change in diet.

When is surgical removal of the anal sacs an option?

If there are severe repeated anal gland infections and the dog does not tolerate medical treatment and manual emptying of the anal sacs then surgical removal is considered. The procedure is performed under general anaesthesia and does carry a small risk of disturbance to the dog’s ability to control passing poo. In most cases the lack of control when pooing is temporary but due the closeness of the nerves controlling continence to the anal sacs themselves there is this risk of them being damaged. Remember that your vet will discuss the pros and cons of a procedure with you so that a joint and informed decision can be made by you with the help of your vet.

I hope that this answer has been helpful for you and that your dog starts to feel more comfortable soon.

Shanika Winter MRCVS (Online Vet)

If your dog has a problem with its anal glands please book an appointment to see your vet, or use our online symptom checker

Fat pets: silently suffering due to their owners’ “kindness”

Here’s a paradox: the biggest cause of suffering in pet dogs may be  people who believe that they love their pets the most. What am I talking about? Overfeeding and its consequence: obesity.

Over a third of dogs in the UK (2.9million) are overweight or obese while 25 per cent of cats (3 million) suffer the same problem. These animals have a serious risk of developing diabetes, heart disease and arthritis, and have a lower life expectancy than pets with a healthy weight.

Arthritis is probably the most common issue that causes physical suffering. As a vet, whenever I treat an older dog for sore joints, I write out a check list of the treatment plan. And the top of the list, in nearly every case, is “weight loss”. For many animals, this is more effective than any medication.

The people at Battersea Dogs and Cats Home will be discussing this problem in tonight’s episode of Paul O’Grady: For The Love of Dogs on ITV1 at 8pm. Prevention of obesity seems simple in theory, but for some reason, many pet owners find it difficult. Again, part of the problem may be that we see pets like little humans, and we feed them accordingly.

The Battersea team have put together some simple tips that may help owners understand how to keep their pets slim and trim.

The first aspect is to work out the amount that a pet needs to eat: this depends on its breed, age and size, but as a rough indication, a small dog only needs about 350 calories a day while for a cat, it’s around 280 calories. So a slice of toast is equal to a third of the dog’s daily calories, equivalent to a human eating half a loaf of white bread. Other useful comparisons include a 3cm cube of cheese (equal to a whole cup of molten fondue cheese), one custard cream (half a pack of custard creams), and half a tin of tuna (a large cod n’ chips from the local chippie).

The second tip is to stick to a standard diet, without extras. It’s a common misconception that dogs and cats get bored with their food. When pets turn their noses up at their dinner, it’s often because they aren’t hungry rather than because they don’t like it: they will often still eat interesting nibbles if offered. It’s similar to the way that we humans will often manage dessert at the end of a meal, even if we’re feeling comfortably full. This is a common cause of weight gain in pets, just as it is in humans.

Third, if you’re worried about your pet’s weight, consult your vet. There are medical reasons for weight gain that may need to be ruled out, and a regular (free) weigh in on your vet’s electronic scales is the best way to monitor your pet’s body condition. It’s difficult to assess this by just looking, especially when you see your pet every day, because weight gain happens so gradually.

Pets don’t get fat because they choose to eat too much: it’s because their owners choose to feed them so much.

If you have an obese pet, there’s no dodging it: it’s your fault. The situation can be remedied, so don’t despair. Take an action to do something about it today. Go on: pick up the phone, call your vet and arrange that all-important weigh-in.

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