Browsing tag: sedative

Sedatives and Sedation in Horses

We routinely sedate horses in practice – after vaccination, it’s probably the most common “routine” job that we do. So, what are we doing? How do the drugs work – and why doesn’t it always happen the same way?

“Sedation – a state of rest or sleep… produced by a sedative drug.”

That’s the dictionary definition, and it makes it sound lovely and simple – give a drug, and the patient goes to sleep. Of course, in reality (as usual with anything equine!) life isn’t that easy…

For those who haven’t seen it before, a sedated horse doesn’t lie down, but their head gets lower and lower, and they may require something to lean on to help them balance. It’s also important to remember that a sedated horse CAN still kick – they’re just much less likely to do so! It often seems that the horse is still more or less aware of what’s going on around them, but they’re too sleepy to care about it. As a result, we’d almost invariably use pain relief and local anaesthetic as well if we’re carrying out a surgical procedure.

There are a wide range of situations in which we like to use sedation. Generally, it’s to make the horse more amenable when something nasty or scary is being done to them. Of course, this varies from horse to horse. There are quite a lot of horses out there that need a sedative before the farrier can trim their feet; and there are others that will allow you to suture up a wound without sedation or even local anaesthetic (not recommended, but occasionally necessary).

Probably the most common reasons we sedate horses for are…

1) Stitching up wounds, to stop the horse wriggling!

2) Tooth rasping, especially when using power rasps and dremels

3) Some surgical operations – for example, many vets prefer to castrate colts under standing sedation, rather than a general anaesthetic. This is because sedation is much safer than a general anaesthetic… On the other hand, the surgery is easier and safer (for the vet, as well as the horse) if the patient is completely “out”, so it comes down to the type of horse and the preference of the vet doing the op.

It’s important to remember that all sedatives temporarily alter the way the horse’s brain and body works, and have a serious impact on the heart and circulatory system. As a result, they’re all prescription-only medicines, and your vet will want to satisfy themselves that the patient doesn’t have any underlying heart problems etc before using them. Overdose of a sedative is rarely fatal in a healthy horse, but it can still be dangerous, especially if there is any underlying illness that makes them less good at maintaining their blood pressure. Its also vitally important to tell your vet the horse’s whole medical history if you’re asking them to give a sedative – there have been cases of horses who were being treated with a (very safe) antibiotic (TMPS); the owner forgot to tell a vet this, and the combination of sedative and this antibiotic has resulted in a heart attack (technically, a fatal arrhythmia).

There are three routes by which we normally give sedation:

1) By syringe or in feed.
This is the slowest, least powerful and least reliable way to sedate a horse, but it has two advantages – you don’t need a vet to come and do it, and you don’t need to get so close to the horse to give it.
The drug most commonly used is ACP, sold as Sedalin or Relaquin paste. Occasionally ACP tablets are used, although there are strict restrictions on when a vet is allowed to prescribe tablets instead of paste. There is a newer drug now available as a syringe, detomidine (sold as Domosedan gel), which is absorbed across the membranes in the mouth so shouldn’t usually be given with food, but does work faster and give better sedation than ACP.

2) By injection into the muscle.
Many injectable sedatives can be given into the muscle – this injection is more reliable than by mouth, but requires much higher doses than if given into the vein (in my experience, you need 4-5 times as much, and it takes about twice as long to work). It’s only usually needed if the horse is too wild or dangerous to get a vein, but it’s quite useful to “take the edge off”, and then I can top up with intravenous sedatives if needed. The other situation where I’ve occasionally used it is when a severely colicing horse has to take a long ride in a box to get to a surgical centre. In these cases, I have sometimes given the driver a preloaded syringe so that if he horse freaks out or goes crazy in transit, they can give it something to calm it down and relieve the pain until they arrive.

3) By intravenous injection.
Intravenous sedation is by far the best option if possible – it works fast (usually 5-10 minutes), you need lower doses, and you get much better sedation than by any other route. This is what I’ll be concentrating on below.

There are three “families” of drugs used to sedate horses:

Acepromazine (ACP).
This is a very “dirty” drug, in that it affects a wide range of body systems. It can only produce mild to moderate sedation on its own, and the effects are very variable between horses. It’s important to remember that once sedation has been achieved; increasing the dose WON’T result in deeper sedation, just more side effects. It also has no painkilling properties.
There are two side effects in particular that we as vets watch out for with ACP. Firstly, it can lead to significant drop in blood pressure, because it makes peripheral blood vessels dilate (this is why it’s sometimes used in laminitis). The second effect is much more interesting – ACP is a mild muscle relacant of some muscle types, so it can be useful in azoturia and choke. There’s one exception though (male readers of a senstive disposition, look away now…): ACP is a very powerful relaxant for the retractor penis muscle. This is the muscle that holds the penis in the sheath, and even low doses of ACP usually lead to male horses “dropping” the penis. This can be useful, but unfortunately in some horses (especially stallions, with a larger and heavier penis than most geldings); the paralysis of the penis can be quite prolonged, which can result in penile trauma. In extreme cases, this can be permanent or lead to gangrene, requiring amputation. Bottom line – if at all possible, avoid using ACP in stallions and entire colts!
ACP does, however, have a place in sedation – when mixed with other drugs, it often prolongs sedation and means that the doses of each part of the combination can be dropped, reducing the risk of side effects.
A quick note on ACP tablets – under the current Veterinary Medicines Cascade laws, it is illegal to use ACP tablets instead of paste in horses unless the vet has a clinical reason (unfortunately, price isn’t considered good enough) to think that they are more appropriate. As a result, if your vet refuses to give you the tablets, they’re not trying to rip you off – they’re just obeying the law.

Opiates
Although opiates on their own are only very weak sedatives in horses, when combined with other drugs they lead to much deeper and smoother sedation than any other drug on its own. The drug usually used is butorphanol, which is a synthetic opiate (it’s a mu/kappa agonist/antagonist related to buprenorphine, for anyone interested) that has a fairly good painkilling effect as well as potentiating sedation from other drugs. Fortunately, it also has very few side effects, although its worth bearing in mind that any other opiates (e.g. Pethidine or Fentanyl) that the horse is given up to about 8 hours later won’t work quite like they’re supposed to, as the butorphanol will partially block their activity.

Alpha-2 Drugs
These really are the mainstay of sedation in horses (and in dogs and cats, for that matter). Alpha-2 drugs act by tricking the body into thinking it’s produced too much adrenaline, so it stops releasing it, resulting in reliable deep sedation. They’re also pretty powerful painkillers.
There are three drugs that are commonly used, with slightly different properties. Detomidine and Romifidine are both fairly long acting drugs (30-40 minutes after i/v use), and when mixed with butorphanol are the standard sedative preparation for intravenous use, or on their own into the muscle. Detomidine is also available in a syringe for oral use.
The third drug is xylaxine; this is a bit different in that it gives milder sedation, and only lasts 20 minutes or so. It’s particularly useful for sedating horses for nerve blocks etc, where in half an hour they need to be completely recovered and able to trot up.

Before I sedate a horse, I always have a good listen to the horse’s heart, and check its pulse and colour to make sure its cardiovasclar system is healthy. I’ll then double check it’s not on any medication, and then give i/v sedation.
I like to use either detomidine or romifidine mixed with butorphanol for routine sedation – I personally prefer detomidine, but that’s probably just because it’s what I “grew up” as a vet using! For longer lasting procedures, or if I want muscle relaxation (especially for dentals where I want the tongue nice and floppy!), I add ACP into the mix.
Dosage is incredibly variable between horses and experience and judgement is more important than all the book learning available. As a rule of thumb, the bigger the horse, the less sedative per kilo of body weight it needs (so Shetlands often need as much as a light hunter). In addition, it depends on temperament – the more highly strung or excited, the more sedatives are needed. The other thing to remember is that apparently identical horses, in the same circumstances, may react very differently – the dose that will have Alf so deep his head’s on the floor will have Brutus untouched, while Charlie is in the “Goldilocks” zone where he’s just right. Of course, it also depends how deep the sedation you want – although personally, I’ve found that if you aim for “light sedation” to start with, you usually end up having to top the horse up halfway through.
Once the injection’s been given, it is VITAL to give the horse time for it to work in a quiet, dim, calm place. If the horse gets excited while you’re waiting for the sedative to kick in, it won’t work well. This is doubly true for oral sedatives, but it applies to injections as well.
During the procedure, its sometimes necessary to top up, which is fine – the great thing about the drugs we use is that they work fast enough i/v that you can monitor their effects more or less in real time. Recovery is usually rapid and uncomplicated, although it’s important not to let the horse eat anything until it’s completely woken up, or it may choke.
Very occasionally, I’ve had a horse that refused to wake up, or went too deep. After my first one, I took to carrying the antidote (Atipamezole, aka Antisedan or Sedistop) with me when I sedated sick or old horses. It’s very expensive, but it works within a minute or two to reverse the effect of alpha-2 drugs – and once they’re reversed, the horse wakes up incredibly fast!

In practice, sedating horses is as much an art as a science, and there’s rarely one “right answer” – it depends on the horse, the circumstances, and what you’re trying to achieve. The main purpose is to allow us to treat your horse effectively and humanely.

If you are worried about any problems with your horse or pony, please talk to your vet or try our Interactive Equine Symptom Guide to help decide what to do next.

Part 3: Surgical Colic

As we saw in the previous part of this series, Medical colics are those which can be managed medically, usually on the yard. However, about 1 in 10 cases of colic require emergency referral to an equine hospital for surgery.

This is what most horse owners are terrified of. The general indicators that a horse has a surgical colic are:

1) Heart rate over 60 that isn’t relieved by injectable painkillers.
2) Dilated loops of small intestine on rectal exam.
3) Positive stomach reflux from the stomach tube.
4) A definite rectal diagnosis of a surgical problem.
5) “Toxic rings” – dark red or purple gums, that indicate that the horse is going into toxic shock.

Of course, it varies between horses, and the vet has to make a judgment call based on all the evidence available.

We also have to talk to the (by now usually frantic) owners about costs. Colic surgery usually costs between £4000 and £5000, but can easily be a lot more. Even if the horse is insured, it is important to check how much the insurance company will cover – there are a couple of companies out there who will only cover part of the costs of emergency surgery. If in doubt, always call your insurer’s helpline.

However, colic surgery is one of the most genuine emergency operations there is – and it can be truly life-saving.

So, what causes a surgical colic? Probably the most common are:

1) Twisted bowel. If a length of bowel twists around itself, it can cut off the circulation. At this point, the gut begins to die, and unless it can be removed by surgery, and quickly, the horse will go into toxic shock and die. This commonly happens in the small intestine or occasionally the colon, but there’s also a condition where the caecum gets turned partially inside out (an intussusception).

2) Small intestinal blockages. Horses rarely eat things that get stuck in the small intestine (although it can happen). More commonly, a really heavy worm burden can simply block up the bowel; with the bowel overfull, the blood supply starts to fail, and the gut, again, can die. I once had a patient who was a little foal with a severe colic; we removed two gallons of worms from her small intestine!

3) Strangulating Lipomas. These are really common in older horses and ponies. A small, benign, fatty tumour forms somewhere in the abdomen, causing no harm at all. However, it grows on a stalk, and eventually, the stalk gets wrapped around a length of gut, cutting off the blood supply… This results in the bowel dying, as if it had twisted. Fortunately, these are usually really simple surgical procedures; unfortunately, older horses and ponies are less likely to be insured for surgery.

There are also a number of medical conditions that can mimic those requiring surgery – particularly peritonitis and anterior (or proximal) enteritis. Horses with these conditions are often referred for possible surgery because it’s very hard for the vet in the field or on the yard to be 100% certain they’re not surgical. I think that most of us would say it makes a lot more sense to have the horse at the hospital, with a surgeon on call, to make the definitive diagnosis, rather than waste time in the stable, and risk having to then decide it needs surgery when it’s still an hour or more away in travelling time from the hospital!

So, what happens when the vet decides that a colic case isn’t suitable for medical management?

Firstly, they’ll talk to you about the options. If a horse isn’t insured, or there’s no money for treatment, it is a perfectly respectable and responsible decision to decide, sadly, to put the horse to sleep rather than prolong its suffering.

Hopefully, of course, that won’t be the case. Once you and the vet have decided that referral is the way forward, your vet will get in contact with a referral hospital. If you’re very lucky, it will be one run by your vet’s practice, but in most cases, it will be a specialist referral hospital. I must say here that not every centre with surgical facilities is able to cope with emergency colic surgery – they need not only to have the facilities (knock-down box, operating theatre, recovery box etc), but also the staff (not only a surgeon, but also enough vets and nurses to take care of your horse in the vital recovery period). Your vet will have a list of suitable referral hospitals – generally, its best to send the horse to the closest one with the shortest transport time, but your vet will be able to advise you.

Making an emergency referral is simple – but only your vet can do it. A referral hospital will not accept referrals from the horse’s owner! Once you’ve made the decision to refer, your vet will call them and speak to the veterinary team on call, who will be available 24/7/365 (when I was part of one such team, we ALWAYS seemed to get our referrals at about 10pm!). They’ll let him or her know what they want done during transport – generally, they’ll describe what painkillers they want given, and what samples they want taken (don’t be surprised if your vet gives you a couple of blood tubes to take up and give to the referral team). In addition, they’ll sometimes ask the vet to put in a stomach tube and tie it in for the journey – this is to prevent the stomach from getting over-full and bursting if there’s an obstruction in the small intestine. Don’t forget your horse’s passport – legally, they do need it even when being rushed to emergency surgery.

Your vet will generally give you directions and a contact number for the hospital, and send you on your way. Remember, they can’t normally go with you, because your horse’s colic, while devastating, is probably only one of several cases they’ll have to deal with.

If there’s a problem (e.g. your horse getting distressed) in transit, call your vet or the referral number you were given – but if at all possible don’t stop unless they tell you to! Remember, you’re on your way to the best equipped help available.

On arrival at the hospital, you can expect to be met by the veterinary and nursing team. Your horse will be rushed to an assessment area, and you’ll probably be given a lot of scary-looking paperwork to sign. Generally, this comes into 2 parts – firstly, you’re signing to give consent for whatever they need to do (and remember, a lot of drugs aren’t technically licensed for use in horses, because the manufacturers haven’t paid for an official license for that drug in horses. It doesn’t mean a drug is dangerous or experimental, it’s probably used on a daily basis by the hospital. You’ll have to sign consent to use unlicensed medication – it’s absolutely routine, and nothing to worry about). Most hospitals will also ask to see your passport – if you haven’t got it, or it isn’t signed to mark the horse as “not intended for human consumption”, legally the hospital can refuse treatment (although they rarely do).

The second set of paperwork you’ll sign is a bit more pedestrian – you’ll be signing to say that you will pay for any treatment!

While you’re contemplating the paperwork, your horse will be undergoing another examination by the veterinary team. This is to establish what’s going on, and what’s changed since your vet examined him back on the yard. They may well repeat some tests – most colic conditions are dynamic (i.e. constantly changing), and sometimes the change is more useful in working out what’s going on than a one-off test. Other tests they may wheel out include ultrasound – the powerful ultrasound systems available in a hospital environment can give the vets a lot more information about what’s going on. The vets will then make a decision about what to do – don’t be disappointed or worried if they don’t rush immediately to surgery! They may decide to try a course of medical treatment first (remember, they don’t have to rush as much as your vet does – if your horse’s situation deteriorates, they can operate at a moment’s notice).

In many cases, however, they will decide to take the horse straight to theatre. If so, you normally won’t be able to follow, so I’m going to describe what happens once you’ve been gently steered in the direction of a waiting room.

To begin with, the horse will have an intravenous catheter fitted, to allow easy access for fluids and drugs. A horse with colic is systemically weakened, so will almost invariably be given intravenous fluids during surgery. He’ll then be given a premed – this is a sedative, designed to make induction into anaesthesia gentler. It will usually contain the drug acepromazine, because the use of this before surgery has been demonstrated to reduce the risks of anaesthetics.

He’ll then be led into a knock-down box: this is a special padded room, designed to make induction of anaesthesia safer. Then he’ll be anaesthetised with an injection containing (usually) a mixture of 2 anaesthetic agents, ketamine (no, it’s not a tranquilizer, it’s an anaesthetic) and diazepam or a similar drug. Shortly after the injection, he’ll go wobbly, and then quickly lie down.

Once he’s asleep, the team will swing into action: a tube will be passed down his throat to help him breathe and he’ll be moved into the operating theatre. While this was going on, the surgeon(s) will have been scrubbing up, ready to start.

Once he’s in theatre and safely ensconced on a well cushioned table (to prevent pressure sores etc), he’ll be put onto anaesthetic gas to keep him asleep.

Colic3 - SurgeryThe surgery involves a long incision down the midline of the belly. The surgeons can then have a good look through all the intestines, to find the problem. This is the exciting, sexy bit, but it’s actually pretty simple in principle: “if in doubt, cut it out”. In other words, removing devitalized (dead) bowel, emptying out anything in the bowel that shouldn’t be there (e.g. a caecal impaction), replacing anything that’s got stuck in the wrong place (e.g. an entrapment) and untwisting anything that’s tied up. There are usually at least 2 surgeons, because one person is needed to hold loops of intestines (and they don’t stay still – sometimes they wriggle around in your arms)! Meanwhile, the anaesthetist will be carefully monitoring all sorts of parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, ECG, reflexes, breathing and blood gasses can all be monitored at many hospitals) and adjusting the anaesthetic and any other drugs to give the safest and most effective anaesthetic.

Once whatever the problem was has been found and (hopefully) sorted out, your horse will be returned to the recovery room. In many ways, this is the most dangerous part of the procedure. Horses are very prone to breaking things when they wake up, so everything is done to keep it as calm and quiet as possible. Sometimes, the veterinary team will help the horse to rise, using hoists and lifts; other times, it works out better to let him get up in his own time. In either case, he will be moved into a padded room, and left in dim light, as quietly as possible, so he wakes up slowly.

Once awake, and steady on his feet, he’ll be moved to an intensive care box; he’ll almost certainly be on a drip to keep him hydrated. At regular intervals through the next 24 hours (or longer) he’ll be checked by vets and nurses. In some cases, the guts don’t start working properly on their own, and medication may be needed to encourage motility (e.g. a lidocaine drip). Although everyone gets excited about the surgery, it is this recovery period that is in many ways the most important in getting a good long-term prognosis.

As time goes on, the vets and nurses will try and tempt the horse to eat – normally, we’ll try and get him eating fresh grass as soon as possible. As soon as he is stable enough and eating on his own, he’ll be sent home – most horses do better in their own home environment, so as soon as they no longer require advanced medical intervention, they can go home. Once home, it’s important that the discharge instructions from the hospital are followed – it can be tempting to try and speed things up, but don’t rush it! Major abdominal surgery takes time to recover from.

Colic is a worrying condition to have to deal with as an owner, especially as it often seems to come out of the blue. However, if you ever have to go through it, I hope that having read these blogs, you’ll have some idea of what’s being done, and why. Remember, our aim as vets is to help your horse and, if at all possible, send him home to you fit and well.

If you are worried your horse or pony may be suffering from colic, talk to your vet, or check the symptoms using our Interactive Equine Symptom Guide to help assess how urgent the problem may be.

Tooth Care for Horses

Jack_in_StableI’ve been thinking about teeth this week – horses’ teeth in particular. That’s partly because my own horses are due for a dental check up, but also because there’s been a report in one of my journals that really made me think how much dental work has moved on in the last ten or fifteen years!

When I was training as a vet, an equine “tooth check” mainly involved grabbing the tongue, having a quick feel round, then rasping away at anything that felt sharp. If you were properly equipped, you’d use a gag (aka a dental speculum); if not, many vets were happy to work around the horse’s tongue and teeth.

Nowadays, that sort of cursory examination really isn’t good enough in many cases. There are a lot of very well trained and experienced vets, as well as good equine dental technicians (EDTs) who would probably need a sit down if they saw some of the things that were commonplace not that long ago!

We also have many more “paraprofessionals” now – EDTs who have a variety of qualifications, and there seem to be fewer quacks out there than there used to be. That said, if you’re asking an EDT to do your horse’s teeth, check out their qualification first: if something goes wrong, some insurance companies won’t pay out if the EDT isn’t registered with the BAEDT (British Association of Equine Dental Technicians).

For a start, a proper tooth check up needs to include a clinical examination of the horse – is he losing weight? Are there any lumps or bumps on her head that might indicate a tooth root problem? How well are his intestines working to digest his food? It’s also true that it is not possible to do a full mouth exam without a gag of some sort. If you’re brave enough, yes you can feel the outside edges of the teeth by running your hand up, but anyone who thinks that holding a horse’s tongue will stop them biting your fingers has either been very lucky, or hasn’t tried it! A gag really is essential so you can examine the inner surfaces of the teeth, and also so you can have a look at the mouth. Although you can learn a lot from feeling, there are some conditions that are easier to detect and evaluate by sight, using a head lamp or a pen torch to have a good look around the mouth.

Now, of course, we have to consider the horse himself. In my experience, about 1 in 3 horses aren’t safe even to examine without some degree of sedation. Yes, you can often get away with it – but once you’ve put a gag in, you’ve effectively given the horse a lethal weapon. He doesn’t have to turn his head that far or that fast to knock someone out, or worse. I’ve only had this happen once while I was working on a horse, but that’s enough for me to be very certain I don’t want anyone else to be injured.

Of course, only a vet can legally prescribe sedatives to a horse, so in many cases, this is where EDTs have to call in backup. And please note, I’ve found that ACP (e.g. sedalin) barely takes the edge off a nervous horse; for dental work, injectable sedatives are preferable.

Once the exam is complete, we need to decide what we’re going to do with whatever we’ve found. Most horses, especially those who are seen regularly, will have a few sharp edges where the tooth has grown into sharp points as part of its daily wear pattern – remember, horses’ teeth grow down from the roots constantly through life, and are worn away by the teeth opposite. If they don’t line up properly side to side, we get sharp edges and points (usually on the outside, by the cheeks, at the top and the inside, by the tongue, at the bottom); if the misalignment is front to back, we get hooks (at the front of the first cheek teeth, usually on the top) and ramps (at the back of the last cheek teeth, usually on the bottom). All of these changes can make it painful or difficult to chew if they are allowed to continue, and sharp edges can cause mouth ulcers. I’m sure everyone knows how painful those can be! It’s even worse if a tooth is missing – the opposite one will grow down into the gap. In severe cases, this can cause “tooth lock”, where the horse is unable to open its mouth because the overgrown tooth has locked into the gap left by the missing one.

If it’s just a matter of sharp edges, or small hooks, these can usually be fixed with a hand rasp; however, if they’re large a power tool may be required. Power tools come in two forms – either a reciprocating power-float, or a rotary dremel are usually used; personally, I prefer a dremel because the blade is guarded so is less likely to damage the soft tissues of the cheeks and tongue. One important thing to remember about power tools is that altough they make the work easier, they do impose some problems of their own. Firstly, it’s very easy to take too much off – I remember once seeing a horse whose owner was very worried because she’d had “the tooth man” (who wasn’t a vet or a qualified EDT) out and then the horse had been unable to eat afterwards. On closer examination, he had managed to power float the teeth as smooth as billiard balls so the mare was no longer able to grind any food. She had to live on porridge and mashes for several months, until the teeth wore in and the grinding ridges reappeared. The second issue is that power tools often generate a lot of heat, and if left applied to the tooth for too long can actually kill the tooth so that it rots and needs to be removed. Some tools have a built in water spray for cooling; otherwise, I only leave the cutting surface on the tooth for a matter of seconds, remove it, apply water if needed, then do a bit more.

Now, once again we need to consider sedation; the more you need to do, the more likely it is that you will need sedation, and personally, I almost always sedate horses if I’m going to use power tools like a dremel. I didn’t always follow this rule, until one day a very calm pony I was working on jumped forward and swallowed the running dremel. Fortunately, all was well in this case, because as I felt the dremel vanish down the pony’s gullet I managed to cut the power, and then retrieve it before it was all gone, but it certainly made me think twice before working on unsedated patients!
In addition, even a quiet power tool makes vibrations that the horse will feel through the bone of his skull. My experience is that it’s a very rare horse that will stand perfectly still and allow you to do a proper job, rather than rush through and say “that’s fine” just before you think the horse is going to start throwing himself around the stable!

There are a number of other problems we come across on regular check ups as well. One of the commonest is misaligned arcades, where one tooth grows out at an odd angle – often straight sideways into the cheek. These require very careful treatment, and often need seeing on a very reglar basis (I had one which needed seeing every 6 weeks a one point).

Another major problem I’ve seen is where there’s a really painful tooth, but nothing obvious on examination. These are often due to tooth root abscesses. Unfortunately, a horse with an abscess like this can’t usually be fixed with a simple course of antibiotics; we need X-rays to see exactly which tooth is involved and how badly, and often we need to remove the tooth. If it’s already pretty wobbly, this can sometimes be done in the field under deep sedation, although it tends to be a lot of physical work to rock it and work it out of its socket. If it isn’t wobbly yet, it usually means the horse needs to come into a hospital facility and have the tooth removed surgically. This can frequently be done under sedation, but occasionally a general anaesthetic is required.

You can find information about other tooth problems that horses can suffer from here: http://www.baedt.com/?c=5386

That said, the vast majority of dental problems I’ve seen can be managed at home, with a good examination, sedation if needed, and then appropriate treatment with either hand or, occasionally, powered tools.

Will I be sedating my horses? One, definitely yes – I have no wish to fight with a 17hh stroppy eventer! The little pony, on the other hand, I’ll see how she feels about it; if I can get away without, I certainly will, but with her there are no guarantees…

If you are worried about your horse’s teeth, talk to your vet or check out any symptoms with our Interactive Horse Symptom Guide to see what to do next.

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